Schedule of the Stay

Date Name of Visited Institutions and Details of Visits
(Research Meeting, Lecture, Inspection, etc.)
2004

Jan. 26
Arrived at Sendai
Jan. 26-27 Had a discussion about this project with the President of Tohoku University and the Director of the Institute for Materials Research at the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University.
Jan. 27-29 Delivered a lecture, joined the Collaborative Research Project on Electron Correlations with New Research Network ("Toward a True Fusion of Physics and Chemistry"), and gave research support and advice at the Institute for Solid State Physics, Tokyo University
Jan. 29-Feb.2 Joined seminars and the SPM project, supported research activities, and offered advice at the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University.
Feb. 2-4 Visited RIKEN Frontier Research System. and offered research support, advice, and lectures.
Feb. 4-6 Offered lectures, research support, and advice at the JSPS Award Workshop V held at Kyoto Universityfs International Innovation Center.
Feb. 6-7 Offered lectures, research support, and advice at NanoMaterials Laboratory, National Institute of Materials Science.
Feb. 7-8 Joined the SPM Project at the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University.
Feb. 8-10 Delivered lectures, research support, and advice at Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University.
Feb. 10-17 Joined Collaborative Research Project on Electron Correlations with the New Research Network ("Toward True Fusion of Physics and Chemistry") and delivered research support and advice at the International Frontier Center for Advanced Materials (previously Advanced Materials International Research Center), Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University.
Feb. 17-20 Delivered lectures, research support, and advice for the Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus.
Feb. 20-21 Joined the SPM Project at the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University.
Feb. 21 Departed Narita Airport for Zurich.
(Note) Please include the date the scientist arrived in and left Japan.


  Invitation Context and Achievements

The research of Dr. H. Rohrer, our visiting scientist and 1986 Nobel Laureate in Physics, has had a remarkable impact on various aspects and dimensions in the fields of materials science, advanced technology, and advanced industry in the 21st century. As a pioneer in the fields of science, engineering, and medicine, Dr. Rohrerfs participation in seminars and discussions for researchers, young researchers, and students in those areas has exerted tremendous influence. We have therefore provided opportunities for academic and research-related exchanges in various universities and research facilities in Japan, such as the International Workshop at Kyoto University, during the doctor's stay.

Dr. Rohrer participated as a visiting professor at Tohoku University in the following ways:

  1. International Frontier Center for Advanced Materials (IFCAM) (previously Advanced Materials International Research Center)
    This center was established in April 2001 to realize the further "globalization" of scholarship, science, and technology at Tohoku University's Institute for Materials Research. During his last visit, Dr. Rohrer provided us with some valuable advice concerning the direction of our personnel and research activities with an eye toward further developing this center. On the basis of this advice, we prepared an invitation plan for Dr. Rohrer as a visiting professor and an operation plan for the center for the new academic year.

  2. The New Research Network's Collaborative Research Project on Electron Correlations - "Toward a True Fusion of Physics and Chemistry"
    From last year, five representative research facilities in Japan started a five-year project to seek further development in the field of material science through organic collaboration beyond the boundaries of each facility. Those five research institutes are the Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University, the Institute for Solid State Physics at Tokyo University, the Institute for Molecular Science at National Institutes of Natural Sciences (previously Okazaki National Research Institutes), the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics at Kyoto University, and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Tsukuba. We had Dr. Rohrer, who has a profound knowledge of research of physical properties, join this project and offer research support and advice for the research projects in progress at the Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University and the Institute for Solid State Physics at Tokyo University.

  3. SPM Research in Host Laboratory
    Dr. Rohrer examined the results of the SPM research project, now in progress in the laboratory, and provided us with advice on future research objectives.

  Contribution of the Visiting Scientist to the Host Institution
(encouragement of young researchers, internationalization of the entire host institution, etc.)

Dr. H. Rohrer has always been interested in and researched the various ways in which the electronic state of thin film (transport phenomenon of Kondo Compounds, multiple critical phenomenons, phase shift of antiferromagnetics, inelastic scattering phenomenon of superconducting material, etc.) since he earned a Ph. D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich. In collaboration with Dr. G. Binning, his research culminated in his invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in 1982 and the successful observation of the surface structure of Si (111) 7x7 at the atomic level. For these achievements, he won Nobel Prize for physics in 1986. He then continued to contribute significantly to further development of the STM (a technique generally referred to as SPM [Scanning Probe Microscope] and which includes AFM, etc.) and became a pioneer in the revolutionary field of nanoscience, one of the most important research fields of the 21st century. Dr. Rohrer not only uses the self-developed STM as a microscope, he has also opened the way to developing processing methodology and electronic devices at the atomic level and developed a revolutionary discipline called "nanoscience". Having had a great impact on human society, his achievement is now counted as one of the 10 great innovations of the 20th century. He has also been nominated for the prestigious Inventors Hall of Fame in the United States.

It is common knowledge that the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology is one of the most important issues for 21st century industrial policy in industrialized countries worldwide, including the Unites States and Japan. The objective of this invitation project was to invite Dr. H. Rohrer, a pioneer in this field, to Japan for three years to have him participate in research as a visiting researcher and adviser in various universities and research facilities, including Tohoku University, and to have him serve as a major catalyst for finding and developing new research subjects. In particular, we naturally expected that participation of Dr. H. Rohrer in education and research activities would have a great impact on young students by conveying the fascinating aspects of research and encouraging them to challenge themselves. In this project, we placed first priority on interaction with and instruction from Dr. Rohrer for young researchers and graduate students and provided as many opportunities for them to communicate with him as possible. For example, we created opportunities not only for discussion with young researchers in the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, but also for meals and recreational activities. We also provided opportunities for regular meetings with staff and graduate students at Sakurai Laboratory so that they could communicate with Dr. Rohrer as much as possible during his stay.

In addition, we held an international workshop at Kyoto University on February 5, 2004, to provide an opportunity for active discussion with Dr. Rohrer and nanoscience researchers within and outside the country. We had many favorable comments from the participants after this event. This year was the Dr. Rohrer's final visit to Japan for this project. He visited various universities and research facilities from Hokkaido University to University of Ryukyus and significantly influenced and encouraged mainly young researchers through his research guidance and advice.


  Others

This was the third year of this invitation project. All the support given by the various institutions of Tohoku University as well as the administrative back-up system of the Institute for Materials Research, the help procuring a private flat, and the support given by the laboratory staff were all carried out smoothly. The collaborative organization of this invitation project was excellent. Preparation at the host facility In Japan, especially the preparation for the international workshop at Kyoto University, was carefully worked out. As a result, despite the relatively short duration of Dr. Rohrerfs stay in Japan, we successfully created many opportunities for various researchers to communicate with Dr. Rohrer. Following the first and second-year of this invitation project, we believe substantial results have been achieved again in this third-year. Dr. Rohrer discussed and gave us advice on developing research strategies at the International Frontier Center for Advanced Materials (IFCAM) (previously Advanced Material International Research Center ) at the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University and also discussed the STM Project of Sakurai Laboratory at the Institute, thereby providing us with tremendous results as the host institution.


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